Main Journal of Bone and Mineral Research Anion Effects on Calcium Metabolism: A Caveat

Anion Effects on Calcium Metabolism: A Caveat

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Volume:
12
Year:
1997
Language:
english
Pages:
1
DOI:
10.1359/jbmr.1997.12.2.298.2
File:
PDF, 80 KB
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JOURNAL OF BONE AND MINERAL RESEARCH
Volume 12, Number 2, 1997
Blackwell Science, Inc.
q 1997 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research

Reply
Anion Effects on Calcium Metabolism: A Caveat
To the Editor:

REFERENCES

Dr. Barzel’s postulate “that the nature of the accompanying anion is the major determining factor of the effects of
sodium salts and calcium salts” is a sentiment we share, but
with the following caveat concerning calcium. Given the
nature of the typical Western diet, calcium accompanied by
a metabolizable anion such as carbonate is an efficacious
form of calcium for promoting calcium retention, but in
persons already consuming an alkaline diet such as vegetarians, it is not known whether more alkalinity is necessary
or even desirable. Further, excess metabolizable anion intake, such as with sodium bicarbonate or calcium carbonate, is associated with development of the milk-alkali syndrome,(1) which is becoming a more frequent occurrence.(2)

1. Orwoll ES 1982 The milk-alkali syndrome: Current concepts.
Annals Intern Med 97:242–248.
2. Beall DP, Scofield RH 1995 Milk-alkali syndrome associated with
calcium carbonate consumption: Report of 7 patients with parathyroid hormone levels and an estimate of prevalence among patients hospitalized with hypercalcemia. Medicine 74:89–96.

298

Susan J. Whiting, Ph.D.
Professor of Nutrition
University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, Canada
Linda K. Massey, Ph.D., R.D.
Professor of Nutrition
Washington State University
Spokane, WA, U.S.A.


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