Main Surgical Oncology Cancer chemotherapy and biotherapy: Principles and practice: 2nd Edition—Edited by Bruce A. Chabner...

Cancer chemotherapy and biotherapy: Principles and practice: 2nd Edition—Edited by Bruce A. Chabner and Dan L. Longo. Published by Lippincott-Raven, New York

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Volume:
6
Year:
1997
Language:
english
DOI:
10.1016/s0960-7404(97)00005-4
File:
PDF, 133 KB
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Surgical

Oncology

Vol.

6. No. I, pp. 61-62,

Published

by Elsevier
Printed
0960-7404197

1997

Science

in Great

Ltd

Britain

$32.00+0.00

BOOK REVIEWS
PII: SO960-7404(97)00005-4

Cancer Chemotherapy and Biotherapy: Principles and Practice,
2nd Edition-Edited
by BRUCE A. CHABNER and DAN L. LONGO.
Published by Lippincott-Raven, New York.
This is the second edition of this book under the
current title which was originally
based on The
Pharmacologic
Principles
of Cancer Treatment
published in 1982. Clearly, the editors have chosen to
maintain the perspective of this book from a pharmacologist’s view. This 810 page book contains 34 chapters and is essentially divided into two major areas. The
first major area focuses on basic chemotherapy with
particular emphasis on pharmacology.
The second
section of the book addresses biologic agents either in
development, in clinical trials, or in current practice.
Biotherapy is also approached as a support system or
adjunct to standard chemotherapy by either improving
responses or maintaining host homeostasis.
Overall, the textbook is well-organized
and the
contributing authors are clearly experts in their respective fields. A great number of authors are on staff at
the National Cancer Institute, although other authors
are on the faculty of esteemed universities and medical
schools. The majority of the chapters reference greater
than 200 manuscripts and certain chapters list up to
700 references. Throughout
the text, the figures are
clean and informative with the major emphasis being
on mechanistic and pharmacologic
actions of the
agents utilized in chemotherapy and biotherapy.
In the first half of the book, the majority of chapters
address the pharmacology of the various classes of
chemotherapeutic
agents. However, several chapters
address topics that may not normally be covered in
standard cancer textbooks. This includes a chapter on
‘Infertility
Following
Cancer Chemotherapy’
and
‘Carcinogenesis:
A Late Complication
of Cancer
Chemotherapy.’
The recent publication o; f this book
allows the inclusion of chapters describing newer
agents that have recently been investigated in clinical
trials. The chapters specifically address ‘topoisomerase’
II inhibitors ‘camptothecins’, and anti-HIV drugs. Also,
a chapter entitled, ‘Investigational
anticancer agents’
addresses drugs currently under investigation in clinical
trials. The last chapter in the chemotherapy section of
this book describes ‘Radiation
and chemotherapy
‘sensitizers’ and protectors,’ another aspect which is
not normally addressed in standard cancer textbooks.
In the second half of the book, the chapters on
biotherapy cover a broad range of investigational and
currently utilized
agents. This chapter not only
describes agents used as antitumor therapy, but also

agents used to protect host tissues during the administration of chemotherapy. Specifically, this section of
the book addresses the pharmacology and use of ‘inter‘interleukin’-2,
and ‘interferons’, ‘interleukin’-1,
leukin’-4,
tumor necrosis factor, colony-stimulating
factors, antibody-based
immunotherapies
for cancer,
and targeted therapy including
‘antisense’, ‘oligonucleotides’, ‘ribozymes’. gene therapy, antibodies, and
modified
peptides and ‘peptidomimetics’.
Further
chapters describe vaccines, adoptive cellular immunotherapy and gene therapy, physical barriers to drug
delivery in tumors and interactions between chemotherapy drugs and biologic agents. This new attempt to
combine a textbook with chemotherapy and biotherapy
should be commended, although this reviewer found
that several areas could be expanded upon. Specifically, a full chapter on gene therapy could have been
included as this issue is only addressed in subsections
of other chapters. Furthermore, a great deal of interest
has recently been generated in the area of ‘antiangiogenie’ agents and likewise only a small subsection of
one chapter is devoted to this.
As this textbook is clearly written from a pharmacological point-of-view,
the reader seeking current
therapies based upon disease site may have difficulty
obtaining information in this text. However, the disease
oriented approach is covered in another text published
by the same publisher (Principles and Practice of
Oncology, ed. ‘Devita’, ‘Hellman’,
and ‘Rosenberg’).
Since the disease oriented approach is not utilized in
this book, chapters on regional chemotherapy, surgical
complications
of chemotherapy
or biotherapy,
or
chemotherapy
and biotherapy
utilized
in specific
patients groups such as those with renal insufficiency,
pregnant patients, or the pediatric population are not
found. Again, these issues have previously been
addressed in other standard textbooks on cancer
chemotherapy.
Overall, this textbook serves as an excellent reference and provides a comprehensive source on the
mechanisms of action and pharmacology of standard
chemotherapy and biotherapy related agents. However,
from a surgical oncology perspective, this textbook is
unlikely to impact a clinical practice due to the fact
that it is written from a pharmacologic perspective.
L. E. Ellis